Everybody’s Irish

 

As a cooking instructor, I love Ballymaloe for their genius educational philosophy, for their respect for the environment, and for the care they put into each aspect of a meal. But, as we all know, none of that means much if the food isn’t good.

 

A small sampling of the beautiful selection of food that was prepared during our demonstration

 

But of course, the food at Ballymaloe is incredible. The recipes were cleverly divided into clusters, each centered on a core ingredient. For example, Rory created many dishes based on Irish Smoked Salmon.

First, he paired it with sweet cucumber salad, potato wafers (fresh chips), and horseradish cream…

 

 

…then he made a Salmon Roulade with cream cheese and dill…

 

Smoked salmon is rolled around herbed cream cheese filling. These are just two of the beautiful ways this recipe can be plated.

 

…and finally a beautiful Salmon-Trout Pâté.

 

Smoked salmon is placed in a ramekin, filled with a beautiful salmon-troute mousse, and then beautifully turned out onto a plate.

 

For our main course, he made a breathtaking Pork en Croute (tenderloin in puff pastry) with Duxelle (mushroom) stuffing. He served this with a simple but delicious brambley apple sauce and gratin dauphinoise, a spectacular and versatile potato gratin which is cooked almost completely in cream and milk in a saucepan and then baked for only 10-15 minutes. It was just amazing. I can’t wait to make it myself!

 

Left: Rory slices open a pork tenderloin, and Right: stuffs it with duxelle mushroom stuffing.

 

Dessert was the most spectacular part of the meal. Here, Rory used ice cream as his core ingredient. He made several, including chocolate, cappuccino, coffee, vanilla and praline flavors. And being a genius food stylist as well as chef, he came up with endless plating styles!

 

Instead of investing in an ice cream maker, Ballymaloe advises making a mousse and then freezing it. That way, you get the airyness of ice cream made in a machine, without unnecessary kitchen gadgets!

 

He made parfaits with hot chocolate sauce, an ice cream bombe made with coffee, chocolate and praline ice cream…

 

Frozen chocolate mousse bombe is topped with pastry cream and little chocolate-filled chocolate cups. Basically death by chocolate, Irish style.

 

… and cappuccino ice cream served with chocolate curls in beautiful coffee cups…

 

Coffee cups are filled with coffee ice cream and topped with beautiful chocolate curls.

 

… but the best things he made, without a doubt, were the iced chocolate oranges. This recipe is simple brilliance at its finest. He simply hollowed an orange, filled it with mousse, froze it and garnished with orange flavored cream and a tiny bay leaf. So beautiful, so delicious.

 

 

In three short hours, Rory even taught us how to delicately make tiny chocolate cases. It takes a lot of patience, but other than that all you need is cupcake wrappers, melted chocolate (50-70% cocoa) at room temperature and a spoon. You carefully spread the chocolate along the sides of the paper, taking great caution to spread the chocolate evenly in a thin layer. Refrigerate for at least an hour and then gently peel the paper away.

 

Rory fills a cupcake wrapper with chocolate to make adorable little cups that you can make at home!

 

Expect some to crumble your hand – Rory says a few always will, its just the nature of this delicious beast – but it is thoroughly worth the effort. Here they are, filled with amazing chocolate ice cream!

 

Clockwise from top left: An assistent tops chocolate filled cups with beautiful pastry cream; she then covers them with cocoa powder; others are flattened on top for an equally fantastic look.

 

Just writing about Ballymaloe, I long to return. I’ll leave you with some other images of my day. Pictured first is the herb garden, of which Susan, a member of Darina’s cheery staff, gave me a lovely private tour as the sun was setting. The focal point of the meticulous garden is the Myrtle bush, in honor of Darina’s mother-in-law, Myrtle, the original Ballymaloe maverick. She was Alice Waters before Alice Waters was. She opened a Ballymaloe’s acclaimed restaurant a little less than 50 years ago and she insisted on changing the menu daily based on what was fresh and seasonal, which was unheard of back in 1964.

 

Left: the myrtle bush dedicated to Myrtle Allen, Darina's mother-in-law. Right: a bush in the Ballymaloe gardens.

 

Most of these recipes can be found in the glorious food bible, Darina Allen’s Ballymaloe Cookery Course. Reading the book isn’t of course, as cool as being one of those lucky people who gets to spend three months in Ballymaloe heaven, but it’s a treasure of delicious, manageable recipes, and it’s quickly becoming one of my favorite cookbooks. Please check it out, and let us know if you decide to try anything!

 

Images of the beautiful shell house in the Ballymaloe garden.

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