Countdown to Thanksgiving 6

Before Thanksgiving, we were all so geared for that first taste of the turkey, gravy, stuffing and mashed potatoes. The second and third bites were pretty fabulous too and I for one was really looking forward to The Sandwich the next day. But by day three leftover turkey is a challenge and most of us just want to see it disappear. When my producer asked me to come up with a leftover cooking demo for the last day of the Thanksgiving TV extravaganza, I thought turkey puff pastry turnovers. It took a lot of trial and error  (do you add stuffing or not, I wondered) to come up with the perfect combination. These turnovers are both beautiful, easy, and practical because you can also freeze them and pop them in the oven when whenever you want. And they include bacon too so how could you go wrong? They were a huge hit with Mark and the girls, and the staff at WTIC went crazy over them too. We hope you like them as well!

 

Question of the Day: What did you do with your leftovers from Thanksgiving?

 

editedleftovers2 

 

Turkey Cranberry Puff Pastry Turnovers

From: Heide Lang

Ingredients:

  • 1 sheet puff pastry sheets defrosted
  • All purpose flour for rolling out the dough
  • 1 egg, whisked
  • 1 pound or more leftover turkey cut into 2 inch pieces
  • 8 or more tablespoons leftover gravy
  • 8 tablespoons homemade or canned whole berry cranberry sauce
  • 6 strips cooked crispy bacon, crumbled
  • 2 teaspoons finely chopped sage or rosemary (optional)
  • 1/3 cup or more crispy shallots* (see our recipe for butternut squash soup for recipe)

Directions:

  1. Roll out one sheet of puff pastry out on a floured surface to 14X14 inches. Square off the edges of the dough using a pizza cutter or sharp knife.
  2. Cut both the length and width of the dough in half so there are 4 equal parts. You will have four 7 X 7 squares.
  3. Whisk 1 teaspoon water and 1 whole egg in a small bowl or ramekin and set aside.
  4. Line a cookie sheet with parchment paper.
  5. Carefully move the puff pastry squares on to a separate piece of parchment paper.
  6. Place two to three ounces of turkey and two tablespoons each of both gravy and cranberry sauce on each diagonal half of the square. Sprinkle evenly with bacon, shallots and ¼ teaspoon of herbs (optional) on each half of diagonal halves as well, leaving a 1/2 inch border around the square.
  7. Brush the entire border of each square with egg wash and fold over
  8. Use a fork to seal the edges and to assure the filling won’t leak out while the turnovers bake.
  9. Cut the parchment paper around each turnover leaving a 2-inch border. Carefully pick up each by the edges of the parchment paper and place them on the cookie sheet (they will be very fragile, and tend to lose their shape if you lift them with your hands on to the cookie sheet.)
  10. Carefully brush each turnover with egg wash.
  11. Bake at 375 degrees for 20-25 minutes, or until golden brown.
  12. Serve immediately with a green salad and roasted vegetables.

Easy Ghoulish Treats

Most people think I’m a little bit strange when I tell people that Halloween is my favorite holiday. It’s really simple. I adore the foods of Thanksgiving, Christmas, Hanukkah and Easter, not to mention all the glorious casual picnic foods from Memorial Day through Labor Day, but I just love the theatre and whimsy of Halloween.

 

Witches Brew Punch with Dry Ice – epic halloween trick/treat | The Road Home

 

This great holiday, after all, is not about gifts or how perfect the table looks for relatives. It’s about fun, and magic, and theatre. It transcends age. We will have 8-year-olds and 16-year-olds side by side at our house all enjoying the same silly food and wearing goofy costumes. What could be better? I get to take my apron off and think solely about what would make kids of all ages happy. The pressure is off to be perfect. All anyone cares about is that the offerings are funny, maybe a little “scary” and of course colorful.

 

Clementine Pumpkins | The Road Home  – cancels out the candy right?

 

So here’s part of our line-up for All Hallow’s Eve at our house. We’ll offer our friends and fellow trick-or-treaters Mad Scientist Bubbly Brew, followed by cauliflower brain dip, and darling little “pumpkins” made of clementines and celery. There will be other things, but these are my favorites. I hope this sampling of our Halloween inspires you to think like a child even for just one day. Happy Halloween everyone!

 

Witches Brew Punch with Dry Ice – epic halloween trick/treat | The Road Home

Halloween Cauliflower Brain with Guacamole - gruesome but great | The Road Home
Witches Brew Punch with Dry Ice – epic halloween trick/treat | The Road Home

Have you got any special halloween foods you make at your house? We’d love to hear about them! Comment below to let us know!

 

 

Clementine Pumpkins

From: Heide Lang

Ingredients:

  • One dozen or more Clementines
  • Several stalks celery

Directions:

  1. Peel Clementines and place on a fun Halloween platter.
  2. Cut a stalk of celery into small pieces for the pumpkin stem. Stick a celery piece into the top of each peeled Clementine and serve!

Creepy Cauliflower Brain Dip with Guacamole

From: Heide Lang

Ingredients:

    Guacamole

    • 4 ripe avocados peeled and pitted
    • ½ cup chopped onions
    • 1/8 cup fresh lime juice
    • ¼ cup cilantro (optional)
    • 1 4 ounce can finely chopped seeded jalapeno chilies**
    • 1 teaspoon salt
    • ¾ teaspoon pepper
    • 1 cup of tomatoes, diced and seeded (or canned diced tomatoes in the winter)

    Brain

    • 1 large cauliflower
    • 1 package of red licorice string

    Directions:

    1. Place all guacamole ingredients but tomatoes in a food processor or in a medium sized bowl. Puree in the food processor or puree in bowl using an immersion blender until very smooth.
    2. Drain tomatoes thoroughly through a sieve and gently blend into the avocado mixture using a spatula.
    3. Remove all of the leaves from the cauliflower and remove the stem so that there is a hollow area, but most of the florets are intact. (Use toothpicks to hold the sides together if it starts to fall apart).
    4. Put the hollowed out cauliflower into a snug fitting bowl. (For a really scary presentation, wrap the bowl in cheesecloth stained with red food coloring.)
    5. Fill in with the guacamole and decorate the florets by weaving the licorice between the florets to make the veins and arteries.  You may also sprinkle a bit of red food coloring on the “arteries” as well but be careful not to overdo it.

    Mad Scientist Bubbly Brew

    From: Heide Lang

    Ingredients:

    • Clear glass container or punch bowl
    • Artificial green or red drink, such as Gatorade or Hawaiian Punch (You may also use a clear liquid like seltzer or Sprite, died with food coloring, if you want)
    • Gummy worms, plastic spiders or any other creepy creatures you wish
    • Dry ice

    Directions:

    1. Fill container or punch bowl with a green or red beverage.
    2. Place gummy worms, spiders, etc, on the edge of the bowl.
    3. Add a few small pieces or pellets of dry ice, just enough to get the brew bubbling and smoky. If it comes in a big brick, you will need to chip pieces off of it. (Do NOT pick up dry ice with your bare hands. Use tongs to handle it or protective rubber gloves if you must pick it up with your hands.)
    4. Serve immediately, adding additional pieces of dry ice every 10 minutes, or as needed.

    Roasted Pears in Cider and Port Wine

     

    There is nothing like finding a dessert that’s beautiful, easy and unbelievably delicious. We all know that it isn’t always so easy. There are a lot of desserts that fit only one or two of those stipulations.  A genoise cake, for example is beautiful and delicious but certainly NOT simple.

     

     

    Roasted Pears In Cider and Port Wine | The Road Home - SO delicious and ridiculously easy.

     

     

    That’s why this dessert is so special.  Did I mention that it’s fairly low-calorie as well? I used to make roasted pears with pomegranate juice and red wine, which was very good but it just didn’t quite have the depth a great autumn dessert should have. I tinkered with apple cider and port wine instead and added ginger, cinnamon and cardamom to create this gem of a fall treat. I honestly haven’t met anyone in any of my classes who hasn’t gone crazy over this one. You may also want to prepare this if you are having an open house as well. The combination of pears, port, cider and spices says cozy autumn like nothing else. I bet it will sell your house in a flash!

     

     

    Roasted Pears In Cider and Port Wine | The Road Home - SO delicious and ridiculously easy.

     

     

     

    The best thing about it is that your friends and family will not only love it but they will be so honored you spent so much time making them a special dessert. The truth (note, I am whispering) is that it will take you about 15 minutes to get in oven. Don’t worry. Your secret will be safe. Who am I going to tell?

     

     

    Roasted Pears In Cider and Port Wine | The Road Home - SO delicious and ridiculously easy.

     

    Roasted Pears In Cider and Port Wine | The Road Home - SO delicious and ridiculously easy.

     

     

    Oh, and be sure to save any extra sauce to pour over French toast, pancakes or waffles over the weekend. The recipe purposefully makes more sauce than you will need for the pears alone so you can have leftovers. Who could ask for more?

     

     

    Roasted Pears In Cider and Port Wine | The Road Home - SO delicious and ridiculously easy.

     

     

    Do you have any easy winner dessert recipes like this one? Let us know in the comments, below!

     

     

    Roasted Pears In Cider and Port Wine | The Road Home - SO delicious and ridiculously easy.

     

     

     

     

     

    Pears in a Port Wine Cider Glaze

    From: Heide Lang

    Ingredients:

    • 1/1/4 cups Ruby Port
    • 1 1/4 cups Apple Cider
    • ½ cup Sugar
    • 1 ½ Cinnamon Sticks
    • 2 teaspoons Grated Orange Peel
    • ¾ teaspoon Ground Cardamom
    • ¾ teaspoon Ginger Powder (or one teaspoon fresh finely chopped ginger)
    • 6 Ripe Bosc or Red Star Crimson Pears, with stems, peeled
    • Vanilla Ice Cream

    Directions:

    1. Preheat oven to 350° F.
    2. Stir port, apple cider, sugar, cinnamon sticks, orange peel, cardamom and ginger powder in medium saucepan over medium heat until sugar dissolves, about 3 minutes.
    3. Using a small melon baller, core pears from bottom of wide end.
    4. Trim bottoms flat and stand upright in 8 x 8 x 2 inch baking dish.
    5. Pour all but a ½ cup of the sauce over pears. Set aside the remaining ½ cup for later.
    6. Roast pears until tender when pierced with a knife or skewer, basting pears with sauce every 20 minutes, for about 1 hour.
    7. Using spatula, transfer roasted pears to serving platter.
    8. Return the pan juices to the saucepan.
    9. Simmer until reduced to 2/3 cup, about 5 minutes.
    10. Strain through a fine sieve into a small bowl, discarding all solids. (This is optional. The sauce will simply be smoother if you filter out the orange zest before serving.)
    11. Spoon glaze over pears.
    12. Serve warm or at room temperature with vanilla ice cream.

    Caramelized Shallots

    I was a bit of a rebel at cooking school, which was kind of surprising considering I was pretty much a nerd in high school. I was always asking a lot of questions, especially ones that began with “Why do we have to….?” One of the hallmarks of great French cooking, I learned very quickly, was that shortcuts were pretty much a no-no. We learned, for example, how to prepare mayonnaise and whip egg whites stiff by hand instead of using mixers or hand blenders just so we would know how if we needed to in the future.

     

    Easy Caramelized Shallots – the latest, greatest kitchen cheat | The Road Home

     

    For chefs in a commercial kitchen this may come in handy on occasion, but I think every minute home cooks spend in the kitchen should be enjoyable. This means you should take shortcuts and even cheat a little sometimes. Otherwise, I know for a fact you will avoid certain ingredients, like shallots, which are tedious to peel since you need so many more them than onions, and slicing or dicing may them burn your eyes. You should never avoid such a wonderful ingredient such as shallots since they add so much flavor, being a little less bitter than onions and really sweet when caramelized.

     

    Easy Caramelized Shallots – the latest, greatest kitchen cheat | The Road Home

     

    So I’ve come up with a an easy way to caramelize massive amounts of shallots with very little labor after being inspired by a  12-Hour Rabbit Bolognese recipe in Jamie Oliver’s Jamie’s Great Britain (a book by the way everyone should own). He just puts all the ingredients whole into this rabbit stew and the onions just fall apart and assimilate during braising. So smart. I thought that perhaps I could achieve the same results with shallots if I just peel large shallots, quarter them and slowly cook them in a bit of oil. It works!

     

    Easy Caramelized Shallots – the latest, greatest kitchen cheat | The Road Home

     

    So what, you say?  Shallots cooked this way are a great replacement for onions in stews, or in pureed soups, mixed in with vegetables or mashed potatoes (see Stoemp). You could also add these to a pot pie, fill puff pastry cups with shallots and add a bit of goat cheese for a easy elegant appetizer, or again really use them anywhere you use cooked onions. Today, for example, I used them for a meatloaf. First I added a bit of cognac to the shallots, and let the alcohol burn off. Then I pureed them before adding them to the ground beef and other ingredients (you can also just chop them – fine or coarse – or leave them just the way they are).  There’s really no end on how you can use them.

     

    Easy Caramelized Shallots – the latest, greatest kitchen cheat | The Road Home

     

    Do you have any go-to ingredient or spice that adds pizzazz to everyday meals? Let us know in the comments, below!

     

     

     

     

    Caramelized Shallots 1-2-3

    From: Heide Lang

    Ingredients:

    • 8 large shallots, or 12 smaller ones peeled.
    • 4-5 tablespoons canola or sunflower oil (or another oil with a high smoke point)

    Directions:

    1. Cut off the root of the shallots and quarter them
    2. Heat a medium size sauté pan and add 4 tablespoons of oil.
    3. Add the shallots and coat them with the hot oil. Break up the shallots with a firm spatula as they cook until all they have all fallen apart.
    4. Cook over a low-medium heat until the shallots start to brown, about 25 minutes. Add the last tablespoon or more of canola oil if the shallots stick to the pan
    5. Remove the shallots from pan and add to your favorite vegetable, stew, soup, or any place else you would use cooked onions. (You may chop or puree them as well.)

    Cozy Spuds for Chilly Days

    One of the best things in life is when you get to try brand new dish or ingredient you didn’t even know existed. I was driving Gabrielle back to school for the fall semester (actually it was our second trip the week after labor day because Gabrielle can never fit all of her stuff in the Honda Odyssey in one trip!) and we decided to have a leisurely lunch in New York before saying goodbye. We set very simple but specific parameters for the meal. The restaurant had to be cozy and unpretentious. We didn’t care if it was famous at all, but it had to serve real food. So Gabrielle put our conditions into the magical search known as Google and out popped Petit Abeille. This tiny restaurant seats only about 20 people and it was a bit gritty and cramped, but the aroma of onions and fried things from the open kitchen made us feel like we were in our own kitchen. It smelled like home cooking, a rarity I’m afraid for most restaurants.

     

    Stoemp – Belgian Mashed Potatoes with Bacon, Spinach, Caramelized Onions and SO. MUCH. BUTTER. | The Road Home

     

    There were many great things on the menu, including lot of offerings featuring real Belgian waffles, including one with fried chicken, which we naturally ordered.

     

    Fried Chicken to Accompany Stoemp – Belgian Mashed Potatoes with Bacon, Spinach, Caramelized Onions and SO. MUCH. BUTTER. | The Road Home

     

    There were the usual omelet brunch yummies as well, but our eyes were especially drawn to the chalkboard, which explained a food we had never even kind of heard of.

     

    Stoemp – Belgian Mashed Potatoes with Bacon, Spinach, Caramelized Onions and SO. MUCH. BUTTER. | The Road Home

     

    We ordered a second fried chicken with stoemp and it was heaven. I love fried chicken sometimes more than life, but I practically ignored my chicken and just inhaled the potatoes. What a brilliant idea and a damn nearly perfect fall food. You have potatoes, cream, butter, and root vegetables all working together to create a cozy rich feeling in your mouth and tummy. And the potatoes were properly salted too! Go Petit Abeille!

     

    Stoemp – Belgian Mashed Potatoes with Bacon, Spinach, Caramelized Onions and SO. MUCH. BUTTER. | The Road Home

     

    Stoemp is a richer version of a similar dish from the Netherlands called Stamppot, which also consists of mashed potatoes, other vegetables (especially root ones), cream, butter bacon, onions or shallots, herbs and spices. You can use any combination of dairy fat, onions/shallots and vegetables you like, but I decided to use two vegetables – kale and spinach – that I don’t really love because I figured all the cream and butter and bacon would more than offset bitter or “good for you” taste from the vegetables.

     

    Stoemp – Belgian Mashed Potatoes with Bacon, Spinach, Caramelized Onions and SO. MUCH. BUTTER. | The Road Home

     

    I couldn’t wait to get home to work on my own version of stoemp, which was good the first time around, but needed more butter, bacon and cream. What doesn’t, really? Here’s my final version, with an added bonus. Most people don’t know this, but there is actually a science to making mashed potatoes. This recipe shows you how to make proper mashed spuds. Russet, Idaho and Yukon make the best mash because they are not waxy and are less likely to lump together. Here, we use russets because I think they yield the tastiest and smoothest mashed potato. You should also dry mash your potatoes first and coat them with some fat (usually butter) before adding milk and cream. It keeps the potatoes from getting gluey and weird as long as you don’t over mash and can live with some lumps.

     

     

    Stoemp – Road Home Style

    From: Heide Lang

    Ingredients:

    • 6-8 strips bacon (local, if possible)
    • 1 large onion or two medium onions coarsely chopped
    • 4 pounds russet potatoes peeled
    • 1 cup whole milk
    • ½ cup heavy cream
    • 6 tablespoons unsalted butter
    • 1 cup chopped fresh spinach leaves
    • 1 cup chopped fresh kale*
    • 1 teaspoon or more of salt
    • ½ teaspoon pepper

    Directions:

    1. Heat a medium size saucepan and add the bacon. Cook until crisp over medium heat.
    2. Remove bacon from the pan and place on a plate lined with paper towels to absorb the fat.
    3. Crumble the bacon with your fingers when cool, and set aside.
    4. Drain all but 3 tablespoons of bacon fat from the pan.
    5. Add the onions to the bacon fat and cook until they are brown and have caramelized, about 30 minutes.
    6. Add the kale and spinach to the onions and continue cooking until the vegetables are soft, about 1-2 minutes. Set aside.
    7. Cut the potatoes into quarters or eighths, depending on their size. You want to make sure the potatoes are the same size so they cook evenly.
    8. Place the potatoes in salted cold water* and bring to a boil. Lower temperature to a simmer and cook until a fork easily goes through the potatoes, about 20-30 minutes depending on the size of the potato.
    9. Drain the potatoes in a colander and “dry mash” without the milk or butter for two minutes over a low flame.
    10. Add the butter and gently mix into the potatoes without mashing (you don’t want to over mash the potatoes or they will be gluey).
    11. Combine the milk and cream in a small saucepan and warm milk.
    12. Gradually add warm milk and cream to the pot and mix thoroughly.
    13. Mash potatoes until smooth or coarse, your preference.
    14. Mix in the bacon, vegetable mixture, salt and pepper until combined well.
    15. Stoemp is best served fresh, but may be made several hours ahead of time.

    * You may also add any other root vegetable or greens you like.

      ** Add enough salt so that the water tastes like the ocean. You can always add more salt to the dish once it is assembled, but potatoes like everything else tastes MUCH better when properly cooked with salt during the process instead of after the fact.

        Smashing S’meaches!

        There’s something oddly comforting about peaches. Peaches have been a part of my family for years, starting with my father’s allergy to peach fuzz. My mother refused to eat peaches when carrying  me, swearing by the old midwives’ tale that consuming peach fuzz during pregnancy causes fuzzy stomach hair on babies. For summers, my mother stored peaches in a plastic bag in a plastic bag in the crisper, tragically excluded from all the other fruits.

         

        S'meaches are a magical combination of a s'more and a peach. Learn how to make them here! | The Road Home

         

        Since moving to New York City, peach fuzz has been the least of my problems. Peaches are beginning to end its season, and before it officially puts up its annual “Gone Pitting” sign, they deserve a grand last hurrah. Eating a peach whole sounds terribly drab, so I was excited to learn on Kitchy Kitchen last summer that you can combine peaches and s’mores, the combination dubbed “s’meaches”. S’meaches replace chocolate with caramelized peaches.

         

        S'meaches are a magical combination of a s'more and a peach. Learn how to make them here! | The Road Home

         

        S’meaches is not only a great way to celebrate the final wave of peaches, but also great for fall housewarming parties and September kids parties. S’meaches also make an ideal midnight snack, so put down that Tupperware of leftovers and make yourself a s’meach!

         

         

        S'meaches are a magical combination of a s'more and a peach. Learn how to make them here! | The Road Home

        S'meaches are a magical combination of a s'more and a peach. Learn how to make them here! | The Road Home

         

         

        Caramelized Peaches

        From: Soyeon Kim, based on Kitchy Kitchen

        Ingredients:

        • 2 ripe peach (halved or quartered)
        • handful brown sugar
        • pinch cayenne pepper

        Directions:

        1. Pit and halve or quarter the peaches. Skin if you desire, but not necessary.
        2. In a small bowl, mix a handful of brown sugar and a pinch of cayenne pepper.
        3. Heat a saute pan on medium stove. Place the peaches, flesh down, on the saute pan. After 2 minutes, sprinkle half the brown sugar-cayenne pepper mix over the peaches and pan. Let the sugar and peaches begin to caramelize for 2 minutes.
        4. Flip the peaches and pour the rest of the sugar mix over the peaches. Let caramelize for 2-4 minutes. Repeatedly pour the caramel over the peaches. Flip once or twice if desired.
        5. Turn the heat off and allow the peaches to sit in the caramel.

        S’meaches (4 servings)

        Ingredients:

        • Caramelized Peaches (recipe above)
        • 4 large marshmallows
        • 4 large graham crackers
        • 4 bamboo sticks

        Directions:

        1. Break the graham cracker into two.
        2. Skewer one marshmallow to a bamboo stick and roast the marshmallows over a fire. (If you do not have a fireplace or a barbecue, you can roast marshmallows over a lit, uncovered gas stove on medium heat with the fan on. If you fear marshmallow combustion or gas poisoning, you can roast it over a candle.) 
        3. On one half of the graham cracker, place the roasted marshmallow.
        4. On the other half of the graham cracker, place one half of a peach (or two quarters).
        5. Squish the marshmallow-graham cracker half onto the peach-graham cracker half.
        6. Voila! Enjoy!

        Baking with Oma: Takes the Cake

        I know everyone always says their grandmother is the best baker, but mine really is. Really. I think I might actually have a case here because my Oma’s baking isn’t even similar to anybody else’s. Her recipes all come from some undetermined german-hungarian-romanian-austrian place. They’re never too sweet and they always contain a twist ingredient that makes the other ones come alive. The only problem was that up until recently she had a monopoly on her recipes because silly Oma is from the “old country” and Europeans have magical skills and don’t need recipes. But we’ve realized recently that she’s no longer 35 (or 75) and while she shows zero signs of going senile… you never know, and this is not a risk worth taking. So yesterday we had her over for our first Baking with Oma session, where she wrote down the steps as best as she could and we translated them into recipes we (and you) could actually follow.

         

        Oma's Incredible Bittersweet Chocolate Yeast Cake – transcribed from memory, like nothing you've ever had | The Road Home

         

        We started with two recipes, or Oma cautioned that we would be up until 3am. Mom made an apple tart which went… um… I’ll let her tell you the story. But I made Oma’s So Superbly Perfect We Can Only Have It Twice A Year Because Otherwise We’d Eat It Three Meals A Day And Get Superbly Fat Bittersweet Chocolate Yeast Cake. Which is superbly perfect, no lie. We only get it on Christmas and Easter and it’s more or less the highlight of both holidays. It’s fluffy yet dense, and not at all too sweet – which is why we can get away with eating it for breakfast even though it’s totally cake. It peels apart in flaky, chocolatey layers and shimmers with subtle underlying notes of anise. And mine came out! I think I just got lucky but I’m still bragging like I got skills because I’m really excited and I’m super proud. I urge you to make it for yourself – it’s an amazing flavor, and not one you’ve ever had before. The only thing about it is it’s neither quick nor particularly easy – I would recommend having some experience with yeast before you try this one out (I think they  made it challenging so we wouldn’t make it too often). But I promise it will be worth all your time and effort – there’s no doubt it will rock your world.

         

        Oma's Incredible Bittersweet Chocolate Yeast Cake – transcribed from memory, like nothing you've ever had | The Road Home

         

        Do you have any special recipes handed down through the generations in your family? Let us know in the comments below!

         

        Oma's Incredible Bittersweet Chocolate Yeast Cake – transcribed from memory, like nothing you've ever had | The Road Home

        German Chocolate Chip Yeast Cake

        From: Oma (Edith Lang), recorded by Gabrielle Siegel

        Ingredients:

        • 4 – 4 1/2 cups all purpose flour
        • 2/3 cup sugar (you can add 2-3 tbsp more if you like it a little sweeter)
        • 3/4 cup milk
        • 1/4 tsp salt
        • 1 1/2 sticks butter
        • 2 eggs
        • 5 egg yolks
        • 1 1/2 tsp vanilla
        • 1 packet yeast (I think active dry, but I actually need to get back to you on that)
        • 1/2 tsp anise seed
        • 1 package of Ghirardelli bittersweet chocolate chips (or same amount of whatever kind you want)
        • Stand Mixer
        • Bundt Pan

        Directions:

        1. In the bowl of a stand mixer, whisk together 2 1/2 cups of the flour with all of the sugar, yeast and salt.
        2. Place the butter and milk together in a small saucepan and heat until the butter is just melted. The temperature should be about 130° F, or lukewarm to the touch, but if it’s not, heat or cool accordingly.
        3. Add this to the bowl with the flour, and mix on low with the paddle attachment until just blended.
        4. Add the eggs, yolks, vanilla and anise to the mixing bowl, and blend with a paddle attachment on speed 4 for about 10 minutes, and then on speed 6 for about 30 seconds – 1 minute, until a soft dough has formed.
        5. Take off the paddle attachment and replace with a dough hook, and add 1 1/2 cups more flour. Blend on speed 2, until flour is incorporated, and a stiff dough has formed, about 5 minutes. Feel dough – it should be moist, but not too sticky, workable, but not too dry. If you need to, add up to 1/2 a cup more flour, a little at a time, until desired consistency is reached. 
        6. Turn out the dough onto a floured surface, and kneed vigorously for 2-3 minutes, to make sure the texture is correct.
        7. Place the dough in a large oiled or buttered bowl, and place in a warm, moist area to rise, until doubled in size. Be patient – this could take anywhere from 1 1/2 to 2 hours. For best results, cover the bowl in a moist tea towel.
        8. When the dough has risen, punch it down, and turn it out onto a floured surface.
        9. Using a piece of string, measure about how big around your bundt pan is. Roll out the dough to about that width, and as long as it takes to make it about 1/3-inch thick.
        10. Evenly distribute the chocolate chips over the dough, and tightly roll up the dough.
        11. Butter the bundt pan, and place the dough inside, and set it to rise in the same warm place, covered with a moist towel, until doubled in size. Heat the oven to 350° F while you’re doing this.
        12. If desired, brush the top of the dough with an egg-wash made of a beaten egg with about a tablespoon of water (does not need to be precise at all) and bake in the oven for about 50 minutes to an hour, until cake is a deep brown, and not too squishy when you poke it (not scientific I know, but it’s the best litmus test Oma could give me).
        13. Cool for about 15 minutes in the pan and turn out onto a cooling rack until completely cool. Eat immediately, or cover very tightly until you’re ready. Try to eat it within 1-2 days, though if you cover it tightly it will keep a little longer. It’s a really good excuse to have people for tea.
        14. Enjoy the heck out of this cake – eat it for breakfast, etc. You worked hard for this, so make it worth it!